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Science: The more time you spend with your mom, the longer she lives

When was the last time you saw your mother?

If you have to think about the answer to that question then invite her over for dinner or go see her RIGHT NOW!

That is if you want to follow the advice from a study from 2012.

The study found that loneliness is an important factor when it comes to the quality of life in older persons. Being alone increases the risk for depression, cognitive impairment and health problems such as cardiovascular disease — which can in itself lead to an earlier death.

The researchers looked at around 1,600 adults with an average age of 71.

The researchers found that 23 percent of the participants who reported that they were alone died within the six years of the study. On the other hand, only 14 percent of those who stated that they had company died during that same six-year period.

The results, which were published in JAMA Internal Medicine, remained the same even after checking factors such as health and socioeconomic status.

In another study from 2010, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, it was proven that social ties could be just as important when it comes to prolonging life as maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active.

“Our social relationships are important not only to our quality of life, but also our longevity,” says study author Julianne Holt-Lunstad, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Brigham Young University, Utah.

“Throughout human history, we have relied on others for survival such as protection and food,” she continues to say. “And despite modern advancements that may [help with] certain aspects of survival so that we can live more independently, it appears that our relationships nonetheless still impact odds of survival.”

Laughter is the best cure

Research has also shown that loneliness and social isolation are harmful to our overall health. In fact, loneliness has been named a greater health risk than smoking or being overweight.

Spending time with loved ones often leads to laughter and laughing is a powerful cure to against failing health. It has been shown to strengthen the immune system, lower blood pressure and stimulate both blood flow and brain activity.

In another study from 2010, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, it was proven that social ties could be just as important when it comes to prolonging life as maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active.

“Our social relationships are important not only to our quality of life, but also our longevity,” says study author Julianne Holt-Lunstad, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Brigham Young University, Utah.

“Throughout human history, we have relied on others for survival such as protection and food,” she continues to say. “And despite modern advancements that may [help with] certain aspects of survival so that we can live more independently, it appears that our relationships nonetheless still impact odds of survival.”

Laughter is the best cure

Research has also shown that loneliness and social isolation are harmful to our overall health. In fact, loneliness has been named a greater health risk than smoking or being overweight.

Spending time with loved ones often leads to laughter and laughing is a powerful cure to against failing health. It has been shown to strengthen the immune system, lower blood pressure and stimulate both blood flow and brain activity.