How To Make Dandelion Syrup


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How to make dandelion syrup for a yummy summer treat.

This simple dandelion syrup recipe is so easy to make. With just some dandelions and sugar you can make a tasty syrup that tastes just like honey.

It’s great for adding a honey flavor to iced tea, lemonade, or your favorite drink.

Every summer our yard is covered in dandelions and while that might drive some people crazy I love that they are there.

Not only are they pretty to look at and provide food for many insects they give you lots of food in the early season too.

All parts of dandelions are edible but the flowers are my favorite for their sweet taste.

How To Make Dandelion Syrup text overlaid on a photo of a mason jar filled with dandelion syrup sitting on a wooden table with a dandelion flower next to the jar.

Dandelion jelly is a must make recipe every summer but I also love making lots of syrup too.

Pantry Planner

Kids love to help make this fun recipe and it’s a great way to keep them busy and teach them about wild foods and food preservation at the same time.

How To Make Dandelion Syrup

Dandelion simple syrup in a mason jar on a wooden table with a dandelion flower next to the jar.
Dandelion simple syrup.

This dandelion syrup recipe is a simple syrup and these are the easiest syrups you can make.

Simple syrups are a equal mixture of liquid and sugar cooked together to sweeten drinks, although they can be used for many other things too.

This recipe makes about 5 cups of syrup and unlike jelly or jam recipes you can make a double batch of this simple syrup and it comes out great.

If you aren’t canning or freezing it, you can simply place the lids on your jars and store them in the fridge. Just make sure to use it up within a few weeks.

Ingredients & Supplies

1. Pick Your Dandelion Flowers

The first step in making dandelion syrup is of course to pick your dandelion flowers.

The best time to pick the flowers is later in the morning or afternoon when the dew is off the flowers and they are fully open.

Make sure to pick flowers only from safe and clean areas. Avoid collecting flowers from the side of the road, or areas that pets have used, or that may have been sprayed.

2. Remove The Flower Petals

After picking the flowers you can rinse them under some cold water and place them flower side down on a towel or paper towel to dry if you like. This will remove any dirt or small bugs that could be in the flowers.

Honestly, though, I’ve worked with dandelion flowers for years and skip this step. I only pick clean flowers and any tiny bugs I remove when I’m separating the flower petals. This has the added benefit of not losing the flower pollen as well.

The fastest way I’ve found to remove the petals is to hold the flower petals together in one hand and with the other hold the bottom of the green part and twist it. The petals pop right out nicely most of the time.

Alternatively, you can use scissors to cut the green part off from the petals.

Measure out 2 cups of lightly packed flower petals.

3. Steep The Flowers

Place the flowers into a large mason jar or pot and cover with 4 cups of boiling water. Place the lid on and allow the mixture to cool, then place it in the fridge.

Let the dandelion flowers steep overnight or up to 24 hours.

4. Strain

Steeped dandelion flowers sitting in a strainer lined with cheesecloth.
Straining dandelion flowers in 2 layers of cheesecloth.

Strain the flower mixture through a fine-meshed sieve, I have the best results when lining it with 2 layers of cheesecloth.

Gently squeeze the cheesecloth to get as much liquid out of the dandelion flowers as possible.

You should have 4 cups of liquid. If you are a bit short add some water to make up the difference.

5. Cook The Syrup

Dandelion flower liquid and sugar in a large pot.
Dandelion flower liquid and sugar in a large pot.

Pour the dandelion liquid into a large saucepan, add the sugar and bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat.

Stir until the sugar has fully dissolved this will take about 5 minutes.

Dandelion syrup in a large pot on a wooden table.
Dandelion syrup ready to skim and canned.

Then turn up the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute. Then remove from the heat and skim off any foam.

This recipe makes a thin syrup that is perfect for adding to drinks and we love to use it as a topping too.

But if you want a really thick syrup, go ahead and cook it longer. Reducing it by half will make a very thick syrup but of course, it will also lower the amount of syrup you get.

Canning Dandelion Syrup

3 pint jars of dandelion syrup canned and sitting on a wooden table with a dandelion flower next to them.
3 pint jars of dandelion syrup canned.

Ladle the syrup into clean pint or half-pint jars leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.

Wipe the rims clean and add the lids finger tight.

Place in a water bath canner and process for 10 minutes or according to your altitude.

Freezing

It’s so easy to freeze this syrup too, so if you don’t have time to can it this is a great alternative.

Ladle the syrup into canning jars, the wide mouth ones are the best because they don’t have curved shoulders.

Leave 1 inch of headspace so the syrup can expand without breaking the jars. Alternatively, you can use plastic freezer containers.

Label and place in the freezer.

Ideas For Using Dandelion Syrup

  • It makes a great topping drizzled over some ice cream.
  • Use it as a simple syrup to make dandelion iced tea or lemonade.
  • Add to some club soda for a fizzy, honey tasting drink.
  • Enjoy it over pancakes or waffles.
  • Use it to make a glaze over baked goods or meat.

Prep Time
30 minutes

Cook Time
6 minutes

Total Time
36 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dandelion flower petals, lightly packed
  • 4 cups granulated sugar
  • 4 cups water

Instructions

  1. Pick your dandelion flowers from a clean area away from pets, roadsides, and sprays.
  2. Remove the flower petals from the green flower base. You can cut them or hold the base of the flower in one hand, and the petals in the other and twist the base. The petals come out easily.
  3. Measure out 2 cups of lightly packed dandelion petals.
  4. Place the flower petals in a pot or large mason jar and cover with 4 cups of boiling water. Cover and allow the mixture to cool then place it into the fridge. Let it steep overnight or up to 24 hours.
  5. Line a strainer with 2 layers of cheesecloth and pour the flower tea into the strainer. Gently squeeze the cheesecloth to remove as much moisture from the flowers as possible. You should have 4 cups of liquid but if you are short add a little water to make up the difference.
  6. Pour the dandelion tea into a large saucepan, add the sugar and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Stir until the sugar has fully dissolved, about 5 minutes.
  7. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring it to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute. Then remove from the heat and skim off any foam.

To Can

  1. Lade your syrup into pint or half-pint jars leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.
  2. Wipe the rims clean and place the lids on finger tight.
  3. Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes or according to your altitude.

To Freeze

  1. Ladle into plastic containers or mason jars leaving 1 inch of headspace. Allow them to cool ad then freeze.

Notes

This recipe makes a thin syrup it’s also called a simple syrup. It’s perfect for mixing with drinks but also good for using as toppings. If you want a thicker syrup then simply cook the syrup mixture longer. You can test to see how thick it is by putting a little syrup on an ice-cold spoon or plate.

For a very thick dandelion syrup cook until the liquid has reduced by half. You will have less syrup but it will be much thicker.

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